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Motobu Choki2

Motobu Choki (1870-1944) performing Naihanchi

Tekki shodan

Tekki Sho-Dan

This Traditional Taekwondo form is also used in Shotokan Karate. There may be differences between the Taekwondo version and the Karate version of this form.

Chul-Gi (also called Chulgi or Naihanchi Cho-Dan) is the name of one of the oldest "taekwondo" forms (having originated from karate, before the formal establishment of what is now called taekwondo); nowadays it is rarely practiced in taekwondo, though sometimes it is still seen in ITF-style and Traditional Taekwondo schools. Many of the founders of the Nine Kwans studied Shotokan karate, and as a consequence many of the earliest taekwondo forms (such as Chul-Gi) are based on karate forms. 

Shotokan Karate is a derivative of Okinawan shurite, and the basis of shurite is form called Naihanchi; more specifically this form is the first in a series of three Naihanchi forms: Naihanchi Cho-Dan. Or to put it another way, there are three Naihanchi forms, of which Chu-Gi is one:

  • Naihanchi Cho-Dan - also known simply as Chul-Gi, the form described here
  • Naihanchi Ee-Dan - sometimes also called Chulgi Ee-Dan
  • Naihanchi Sam-Dan - sometimes also called Chulgi Sam-Dan

When the name "Chul-Gi" alone is used (without a number such as Cho, Ee, or Sam) then the term Chul-Gi usually refers just to the form shown here. Some believe that these three forms were originally a single form with more than 100 steps, but that the single form was eventually divided into these three smaller pieces.

Gichin Funakoshi renamed this form Tekki when he brought Karate to Japan. In Korean, Tekki is known as Chulgi. Chulgi is a very old form thought to be Chinese in origin and possibly brought to Okinawa by the legendary Bushi Nabe Matsumura. Others say that it was practiced in Okinawa even before Matsumura was born. In either case, Chulgi was practiced from Matsumura's lifetime (1860-1930) onwards.

Chul-Gi literally means Iron Horse and stresses techniques performed in a Horse-Riding Stance.

VideoEdit

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Chulgi Cho Dan00:32

Chulgi Cho Dan


Diagram Edit

This diagram is copyright John B. Correljé and is used with permission. Terms and conditions are available at http://sites.google.com/site/tangsoodochonkyong

Nai-Hanji-Cho


Note that the numbering scheme used for the steps in this diagram is not the same as the numbering scheme used for the written instructions below.

Written Instructions Edit

The Beginning Edit

  • 1. Begin in a ready stance that's a bit like an Overlapped Hands ready stance, but with two exceptions: (1) the feet are shoulder-width apart, just like a conventional Ready Stance; and (2), the left open-hand is covering the right-fist.
  • 2. Bring the left foot to the right foot into a Closed Stance (i.e., legs together). Twist the torso to the right (so that your torso and head are facing the Ra direction) while crossing the left hand over the right fist down at the right waist. (This is a bit like a Large Hinge Block to the right waist, but with an open hand on the right fist.)
  • 3. Without moving the feet, twist the torso to the left. By the time the torso is facing straight forward again (Ga), you should be in a position a bit like a Covered Fist Posture, with your two hands in front of your chest, the left open-hand still covering the right fist. Without pausing, keep twisting the torso to the left (until your torso and head are facing the Da direction) and bring the covered-hands back down again to about belt level.
  • 4. Step to the right: Cross the left foot in front of the right foot, so that it's to the right of the right foot. Then turn your torso and head so that you're facing the Ra direction again, and perform a Right Axe Kick to the right side (where the leg is chambered and then strikes inside-to-outside).

First time through... Edit

  • 5a. Step down with the right foot into a Horse-Riding Stance. Your legs should be facing in the Ga direction, but your torso and head should be turned to the right, so that they're facing in the Ra direction. Right Outward Backfist Strike to the temple, at a target on your right side.
  • 5b. Without stepping, Left Elbow Target Strike into the right palm, again to a target on your right side.
  • 6a. Without stepping, without pausing, Left Low Block.
  • 6b. Without stepping, without pausing, with your head facing left, Left Rear Elbow Strike while simultaneously Right Turning Punch. Kihap.
  • 7. Step to the left: Cross the right foot in front of the left foot, so that it's to the left of the left foot. Then turn your torso and head so that you're facing the Da direction. Left Axe Kick to the left side (where the leg is chambered and then strikes inside-to-outside).
  • 8a. Step down with the left foot into Horse-riding Stance. Your torso and head should be facing the Ga direction. Chamber the right fist to the left armpit, then Right Backfist Strike.
  • 8b. Without stepping, without pausing, Right Low Block. Simultaneously, Left Rear Backfist Strike to an opponent behind you, as if hitting them in the face with your left backfist.
  • 9. Without stepping, Left Uppercut.
  • 10. Bring the left foot to the right knee, then put the left foot back down into Horse-Riding Stance. Left Augmented Outward Block (aka, Assisted Trunk Block) to the left side.
  • 11. Bring the right foot to the left knee, then put the right foot back down into Horse-Riding Stance. Again with the left hand, perform a Left Middle Block to the right side.
  • 12. Without stepping, Simultaneous Punch to the left side.
  • 13a. Without stepping, Large Hinge Block to the right side.

13b-20 is very nearly a mirror-image of 5-12 Edit

  • 13b. Without stepping, Left Outward Backfist Strike to the left side.
  • 13c. Without stepping, with the torso still turned to the left, Right Elbow Target Strike into the left palm.
  • 14a. Without stepping, Right Low Block.
  • 14b. Without stepping, without pausing, with your head facing right, Right Rear Elbow Strike while simultaneously Left Turning Punch. Kihap.
  • 15. Step to the right: Cross the left foot in front of the right foot and perform a Right Low Side Kick. (This kick breaks the "mirror-image" aspect of the form. Previously this was an Axe Kick.)
  • 16a. Step down with the right foot into Horse-Riding Stance. Chamber the left fist to the right armpit, then Left Backfist Strike.
  • 16b. Without stepping, without pausing, Left Low Block. Simultaneously, Right Rear Backfist Strike to an opponent behind you, as if hitting them in the face with your right backfist.
  • 17. Without stepping, Right Uppercut.
  • 18. Bring the right foot to the left knee, then put the right foot back down into Horse-Riding Stance. Right Augmented Outward Block (aka, Assisted Trunk Block) to the right side.
  • 19. Bring the left foot to the right knee, then put the left foot back down into Horse-Riding Stance. Again with the right hand, perform a Right Middle Block to the right side.
  • 20. Without stepping, Simultaneous Punch to the right side. Kihap.

Conclusion Edit

  • 21. Bring the right foot to the left foot into Closed Stance facing the Ga direction. Large Hinge Block to the right side.
  • 22. Slide the left foot to the right to return to the Ready Stance from Step 1.

See also: http://www.trinityshotokan.com/documents/tekki_shodan.html

See Also Edit

Many of the forms often used in Traditional Taekwondo are included in the following table. In developing his Moo Duk Kwan curriculum, Hwang Kee assigned symbols, listed below, to many of the forms.

Family / Origin Forms
Basic beginner forms developed by Hwang Kee in 1947.

Kicho Hyeong Il Bu
Kicho Hyeong Ee Bu
Kicho Hyeong Sam Bu

Later variants of the beginner forms, developed by the World Tang Soo Do Association; these emphasize earlier training in kicking.

Sae Kye Hyeong Il Bu
Sae Kye Hyeong Ee Bu
Sae Kye Hyeong Sam Bu

Pyung Ahn forms, also called Pinan and Heian forms. From Shotokan Karate, developed approx. 1870 as beginner forms. Symbol: The Tortoise

Pyung Ahn Cho-Dan
Pyung Ahn Ee-Dan
Pyung Ahn Sam-Dan
Pyung Ahn Sa-Dan
Pyung Ahn Oh-Dan

Naihanchi forms, from Shotokan Karate. Also called Chul-Gi, Keema, and Tekki. Symbol: The Horse

Naihanchi Cho-Dan
Naihanchi Ee-Dan
Naihanchi Sam-Dan

Bassai forms, Escaping the Fortress, also called Pal-Sek. Adapted into Shotokan Karate but originally from Kung Fu. Symbol: The Cobra

Bassai Sho
Bassai Dai (or simply Bassai)

Adapted from Shotokan Karate. Symbol: The Crane

Jin Do
Rohai (also called Lohai or Meikyo)

From the karate form Kūsankū. Symbol: The Eagle Kong-Sang-Koon
From the karate form Enpi. Symbol: The Bird Wang Shu (also called Empi)
From the karate form Seisan. Symbol: The Preying Mantis Sei-Shan
Ji-On forms, adapted from Shotokan Karate.

Ji-On, Symbol: The Ram
Jit-te (also called Ship Soo), Symbol: The Bear

From the karate form Gojūshiho. Symbol: The Tiger

O Sip Sa Bo (also called Gojūshiho)
E Sip Sa Bo (also called Nijūshiho)

Adapted by Hwang Kee from Kung Fu and T'ai Chi.

So Rim Jang Kwon
Hwa Sun
Tae Kuk Kwan

Chil Sung, the Seven Stars developed by Hwang Kee in approx. 1952

Chil Sung Il Ro
Chil Sung Ee Ro
Chil Sung Sam Ro
Chil Sung Sa Ro
Chil Sung Oh Ro
Chil Sung Yook Ro
Chil Sung Chil Ro

Yook Ro, the Six-Fold Path developed by Hwang Kee in approx. 1958, inspired by the Muye Dobo Tongji.

Yook Ro Cho Dan - Du Mun
Yook Ro Ee Dan - Joong Jol
Yook Ro Sam Dan - Po Wol
Yook Ro Sam Dan - Yang Pyun
Yook Ro Oh Dan - Sal Chu
Yook Ro Yook Dan - Choong Ro

See Taekwondo Forms for additional information.

References Edit

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